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7 Best Sock Helpers for the Elderly Reviewed for 2020 (US & UK)

By Abby,
30th March 2018 | Updated: 30th April 2020

What is the best sock helper for the elderly? Read our reviews to find out.

7 Best Sock Helpers for the Elderly Reviewed for 2020 (US & UK)

What is the best sock helper for the elderly? Read our reviews to find out.

Last updated on 30th March 2018 by Abby

Quick Comparison

We’ve tested dozens of sock helpers of all makes and models. We’ve put out socks on with traditional two-corded models and the latest cordless designs.

All of this so we can bring you the definitive list of the best sock helpers.

Our testing resulted in a dead heat between the Aidapt Sock and Stocking Aid and The Wright Stuff’s Easy On/Easy Off Sock Aid. Picking the best sock helper out of these two depends on if you need your aid for compression socks and stockings.

Our comparison table and reviews tell you what you need to know.

  1. 1
    90%
    90%

    The Wright Stuff Easy On /Easy Off Sock Aid Review

    We like The Wright Stuff’s sock helper because it doesn’t require the use of your arms to pull the sock on. There’s no cord pulling required, which may make it a good sock helper for the elderly. The clever base allows you to place a sock into it. You just slide your foot into the base to put the sock on.

    Moreover, you can use the base to take the sock off without any need for bending. It also comes with a grabber, which you can use to lift and lower the base as needed. The only problem we found is that it struggles with compression socks and stockings.

     

    The Good
    • Clever design completely eliminates the need for bending.
    • It’s cordless, which makes it ideal for those with limited use of their arms.
    • Comes with a grabber.
    The Bad
    • It struggles with compression stockings and socks.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

  2. 2
    90%
    90%

    Aidapt Sock and Stocking Aid Review

    The Aidapt Sock and Stocking Aid is a versatile device and may be the best sock helper for people who need to wear compression stockings. It also works well for those who prefer regular stockings and leggings, plus it’s more than capable of handling regular socks. The nylon material that makes up the base is very comfortable, while the 32-inch straps ensure even the tallest people don’t have to bend when using it.

    It’s also a good sock helper for disabled/handicapped people. The easily-manipulated plastic core allows you to shape the helper’s trough with just the use of one hand. However, it’s not always easy to fit your sock or stocking over the three prongs that make up the base.

    The Good
    • Versatile enough for use with a range of garments.
    • Long straps mean you don’t have to bend at all.
    • It’s easy to shape the trough.
    The Bad
    • The three-pronged design can make it difficult to fit your sock on it properly.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

  3. 3
    86%
    86%

    Royal Medical Solutions Deluxe Sock Aid Review

    Simplicity is the name of the game with this RMS Deluxe sock aid, as you won’t have to mess around with the plastic base to find the right shape. It’s excellent for those who need help getting socks on feet, but it does struggle with compression socks and stockings.

    It has 38-inch long cords, which have foam handles for gripping at the ends. The wide plastic base may also make this the best sock helper for those with large feet. However, its lack of flexibility means those with smaller feet should look elsewhere.

    The Good
    • Large plastic base works well with larger socks.
    • Extremely simple design.
    • It has long cords with strong foam handles.
    The Bad
    • It’s not suitable for small socks or compression stockings.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

  4. 4
    86%
    86%

    Patterson Medical Sock and Stocking Aid Review

    Another sock helper that favours simplicity over functionality, this Gammons Preston Sock and Stocking Aid has a curved plastic base around which you’ll put your sock. However, it differs in that it has a continuous loop cord, rather than two cords. This means there’s no chance of the cord detaching from the end of the base, though it does limit the cord’s length to 24-inches.

    The single cord also makes it ideal for disabled users who can only use one hand. It allows for smooth one-handed motion that most other sock helpers don’t offer. It’s suitable for feet up to size 9.5 and it has a 4-inch width.

     

    The Good
    • The single cord design makes this an excellent choice for one-handed users..
    • A single cord also means less chance of the cord detaching from the base
    The Bad
    • It has a small cord length.
    • The based may not be suitable for those with wide feet.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

  5. 5
    80%
    80%

    Aids 4 Mobility Terry Cloth Sock Aid Review

    The Terry Cloth Sock and Stocking Aid is simple and elegant solution, this may be the best sock helper for those who are watching what they spend. The use of terry cloth makes it one of the softer-feeling sock aids around, plus it has a nylon base that adds to the smoothness.

    Much like the Aidapt offering, it uses a three-pronged base that you can use to shape the sock as needed. It also has 32-inch cords. However, the base isn’t as flexible, so those with limited use of their arms may struggle to get their socks in place.

    The Good
    • It’s an excellent budget option.
    • Feels soft and smooth while in use.
    The Bad
    • Inflexible base may make it difficult to use for those with limited arm strength.
    • It’s not the most durable sock helper available.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

  6. 6
    76%
    76%

    Sock Horse Sock Aid Review

    The Sock Horse is another cordless sock aid, this isn’t quite as clever as The Wright Stuff’s offering. The base has a handle built in, which you’ll use to pull your sock onto your foot. It also has rubber grips, which help to keep your sock in place while you’re using the device.

    The curved handle offers good grip, but it only extends to a maximum length of 18 inches. As a result, it’s unsuitable for people with mobility issues that prevent them from bending. However, its wide base makes it an excellent choice for those with large or wide feet. You can also use it as a shoe horn.

     

    The Good
    • Useable as both a sock helper and shoe horn.
    • Offers excellent grip.
    The Bad
    • The short handle makes it unsuitable for those with mobility issues.
    • Its width means it stretches out compression socks and stockings.
    Check price on amazon

    We earn commission fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.
    However, this will not increase the prices you pay for products.

Side-by-side

The Wright Stuff Easy On /Easy Off Sock Aid Review

  • Clever design completely eliminates the need for bending.
  • It’s cordless, which makes it ideal for those with limited use of their arms.
  • Comes with a grabber.
Check price  on amazon

Aidapt Sock and Stocking Aid Review

  • Versatile enough for use with a range of garments.
  • Long straps mean you don’t have to bend at all.
  • It’s easy to shape the trough.
Check price  on amazon

Royal Medical Solutions Deluxe Sock Aid Review

  • Large plastic base works well with larger socks.
  • Extremely simple design.
  • It has long cords with strong foam handles.
Check price  on amazon

Patterson Medical Sock and Stocking Aid Review

  • The single cord design makes this an excellent choice for one-handed users..
  • A single cord also means less chance of the cord detaching from the base
Check price  on amazon

Aids 4 Mobility Terry Cloth Sock Aid Review

  • It’s an excellent budget option.
  • Feels soft and smooth while in use.
Check price  on amazon

Sock Horse Sock Aid Review

  • Useable as both a sock helper and shoe horn.
  • Offers excellent grip.
Check price  on amazon

Frequently asked questions

What is a sock aid/sock reacher?

In the simplest terms, a sock aid, which is also referred to as a sock reacher and sock slider, is a device to help put on socks.

They are particularly useful for those who struggle with arthritis and other conditions related to bones, joints and muscles. A sock slider helps you to put your socks on without the need for the bending and reaching. As a result, they’re important tools for enhancing the independence of those who would otherwise need help putting on socks.

How does a sock slider help you to put socks on your feet?

Typically, they’re made using flexible materials, such as plastic. A pair of cords extend from the ends of a plastic base. The user places the sock on the base and drops it to the floor. They then use the cords to manoeuvre the sock onto their foot. This sock assist mechanism allows you to put your sock on while removing the sock aid at the same time.

However, some sock aids do away with the cords altogether. Instead, they use more complex, free-standing bases that hold your sock in place. You simply slide your foot into the sock without the need to pull on anything.

What's the best sock aid/helper for compression stockings?

We believe that the best sock aid for compression stockings is the Aidapt Sock and Stocking Aid. The large based makes it suitable for stockings, leggings, and socks. Plus its large handles ensure you don’t have to bend at all while using it.

What's the best sock device for disabled/handicapped?

Having a disability or handicap may prevent you from using a traditional sock helper. For example, only having the use of one arm makes using a two-corded sock aid difficult.

That’s why we think the Patterson Medical Sock and Stocking Aid stands out as the best sock helper for disabled and handicapped people. It uses a looped cord, instead of two cords coming out of either side of the base. As a result, you only need one hand to apply your sock or stocking.

What's the best sock aid to help elderly get socks on/off their feet?

Elderly people often struggle with mobility issues. From an inability to bend through to loss of strength in their arms and legs, there are several problems that may prevent them from using regular sock helpers.

That’s why we choose The Wright Stuff’s Easy On / Easy Off Sock Aid as the best sock helper for elderly people. It comes with a grabber that you can use to place the base on the floor or bring it to you.

Moreover, there aren’t any cords. You just slide your foot into the sock to put it on. It also helps you to take your socks off.

What's the best sock aid for people with large feet?

If you have large feet, you need a sock helper that has a wide and long base. This ensures your sock doesn’t loosen up as you’re pulling it onto your foot.

We believe that the Royal Medical Solutions Deluxe Sock Aid is the best sock helper for people with big feet. It has an inflexible base though, which makes it unsuitable for more petite feet.

What's the best sock aid for arthritis sufferers?

The The Wright Stuff’s Easy On / Easy Off Sock Aid doesn’t require any bending or the use of your arms. As a result, it’s an ideal choice for arthritis sufferers. The only issue that it has is that it struggles with compression socks and stockings. However, it can help you put on and take off socks without putting an undue strain on your joints.

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